THE LAW IS NOT ALWAYS JUST

Elizabeth Day, The Law is Not Always Just, 2010-2011. Washed couch grass roots. Installation view, Conny Dietzschold Gallery, Sydney.

The Law is Not Always Just, solo exhibition at Conny Dietzschold Gallery, Sydney, 2011.

Elizabeth Day investigates the early history of Australia, the underbelly, the abject which is not tasteful but underpins our culture. Her tactile explorations use a myriad of materials from bubble gum, hessian, grass, dirt and knitted yarn. Day uses grass to create installations that represent layers of language and vegetation from Australia. Her work is based in a theory of art integrally related to earth, a form of transplantation finding roots in minimal art and earthworks pioneered by American artist Robert Smithson.

Texts on this exhibition and body of work:
Andrew Frost’s exhibition review, What lies beneath, Sydney Morning Herald (Metro: Art).
Elizabeth Day, Liverpool/Liverpool (After The Black), 2011. In “Southerly” vol 71 no 1, 2011.
Ann Finegan, Liverpool Liverpool: The Skin of Translation, 2011. In “Southerly” vol 71 no 1, 2011.
Elizabeth Day, Migratory Words, Migratory Worlds: From Liverpool (UK) to Liverpool (NSW), and Back Again, 2011. In “Crossings: Journal of Mirgration and Culture,” vol 2 issue 1, 2011.

Elizabeth Day, Liverpool/Liverpool: Of the Earth, 2011, washed couch grass roots, 200 x 100 cm, framed in steel. Installation view, Conny Dietzschold Gallery, Sydney.
Elizabeth Day, works from the Cosmos: The Spat Out Ones series, 2009-2011, chewing gum on hessian. Installation view at Conny Dietzschold Gallery, Sydney.
Elizabeth Day, works from the Cosmos: The Spat Out Ones series, 2009-2011, chewing gum on hessian, detail.
Elizabeth Day, works from the Cosmos: The Spat Out Ones series, 2009-2011, chewing gum on hessian, detail.
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